Senior Team win Junior Championship Final

Anglo Printers JFC final

Dundalk Young Irelands 1-4 Glyde Rangers 0-6

Dundalk Young Irelands won their third championship title since 2007 in Dowdallshill on Sunday afternoon, sending Glyde Rangers to a second successive junior final defeat.

Mark Savage’s second half goal will be what the decider is ultimately remembered for, but even that came in scrappy circumstances after his original penalty attempt had been saved low to David Brennan’s left. The loose ball fell kindly for the Irelands’ No. 14 and he slid it to the net, an incident which typified the telling influence of lady luck on the day.

It was a dour spectacle in which no player can claim to have performed to anywhere near their best, with the slippery conditions and the magnitude of the occasion failing to help either side in their efforts.

Glyde were arguably the better of the pair having controlled the first half in almost its entirety. But, just like they did against Glen Emmets 12 months ago, they were guilty of passing up too many scorable opportunities, especially at the death.

Brian Duffy had the goal at his mercy with men steaming inside. He should have stroked the ball over to send the match to a replay, but attempted for the glory pass – which, if successful, could have altered the game’s fate. However, Peter Nixon, from nowhere, fractured the move, reaching his right hand into the clouds and clawing the airborne leather away. It was an heroic, championship-saving intervention.

The drama wasn’t concluded though, as, with practically the final kick, Ciaráin Sheridan dragged his ‘45 attempt off target, as Glyde’s season ended in ultimate disappointment.

There was a typical final paradox on the field at full-time. Many of the sky blues lay crestfallen, whereas Young Irelands’ rejoiced, both before and after Aidan Shevlin’s closing whistle, with a premature invasion having taken place.

Selector Kieran Maguire – a Young Irelander to the core – had his sons, Derek and Dean, playing and was almost overcome with emotion: “I’m delighted. The Irelanders, it’s in our family.

“We eat football in our household. The boys will tell you at times that they won’t want to come home if they played badly because they’ll be told so.

“Adrian O’Donoghue, it’s the same in his house. You eat football and you love football.”